Dunkirk

Which films will win Oscars and Golden Globes next year? Here’s our definitive guide!

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterGoogle+

Well, it’s that time of year again as autumn moves into winter and the road to awards season begins to open forth. Beginning in December with the New York Film Critics Circle Awards and carrying on up to the Academy Awards in March, awards season will take us across numerous bodies and give us countless winners, runners-up and nominees. So here is a list compiled by us at musicMagpie of who will be possibly up for major awards this year.


The Big Sick

Director: Michael Showalter

Sundance breakouts normally land it big around Oscar season (although there are occasions, such as Fruitvale Station, when this fails to materialise) and given its sleeper hit status and the collapse of some of their other contenders, Amazon could make a large push with this one.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay.

Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy), Best Actor in a Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy), Best Actress in a Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy).


Blade Runner 2049

Director: Denis Villeneuve

I was originally planning on dropping this into the technical contenders (especially with the potential buzz that this could finally land an Oscar to cinematographer Roger Deakins), but seeing as how the Best Adapted Screenplay category is pretty weak this year, it could go a little higher.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Cinematography (possibly winning), Best Editing, Best Visual Effects, Best Sound Editing and Mixing, Best Adapted Screenplay.

BAFTA Awards in their respective categories.


Call Me by Your Name

Director: Luca Guadagnino

Like The Big Sick above, Call Me by Your Name has been riding the waves of its recent Sundance success and looks all set to follow in the footsteps of films that have done this in recent years, such as Boyhood and Manchester by the Sea. Nowhere is this more prominent than in the Adapted Screenplay category, where we could see a little golden man being handed to the picture’s screenwriter and maestro of the period drama James Ivory (yes, he of Merchant-Ivory).

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Adapted Screenplay (possibly winning), Best Director, Best Actor (Timothee Chalamet and possibly Armie Hammer), Best Supporting Actor (Michael Stuhlbarg, Armie Hammer or both), Best Cinematography.

Golden Globes: Best Screenplay, Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Actor (Drama). Best Supporting Actor, Best Director.


Darkest Hour

Director: Joe Wright

Well, it wouldn’t be Oscar season if we didn’t have one bog-standard Oscar Bait biopic, and it looks like we’ll finally be seeing Gary Oldman getting his dues. Although, in other categories, its status as Focus Features’ main horse will probably depend on the reception for Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread (which we will come to in a bit).

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Actor (possibly winning), Best Make-up and Hair, Best Costume Design, Best Production Design, Best Picture, Best Director, Best Motion Picture Drama, Best Cinematography (Bruno Delbonnel), Best Original Score, Best Original Screenplay.

A heap of BAFTA prizes.

Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture Drama, Best Original Score, Best Actor Drama (Oldman’s politics have often rubbed the HFPA the wrong way).


Dunkirk

Director: Christopher Nolan

The main contender for Warner Bros and possibly the major visual/technical filmmaking contender we have received for the last few years (2013’s Gravity starting the trend). Also, this is likely to be the film that earns Christopher Nolan major industry recognition, although it’ll probably be Guillermo del Toro who could take the Oscar on the night.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Director (possibly winning), Best Editing (possibly winning), Best Visual Effects, Best Picture, Best Original Score (depending on eligibility), Best Sound Editing and Mixing (possibly winning).

Golden Globe: Best Director (possibly winning), Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Original Score.


The Disaster Artist

Director: James Franco

Critical acclaim since SXSW, weak Adapted Screenplay category and a possible cult classic in the making. Not bad for a feature about the making of 2003 cult classic The Room.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Actor.

Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy), Best Actor in a Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy) (possibly winning).


The Florida Project 

Director: Sean Baker

Well, there’s quite a lot for Sean Baker’s follow-up to his 2015 iPhone shot LGBT comedy Tangerine. It jointly shares the status of being A24’s (the studio that brought Moonlight Oscar success) main priority, could bring awards glory to the most prolific face in Hollywood (literally) Willem Dafoe and has enjoyed massive acclaim since premiering on the Croisette back in May.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actor (possibly winning), Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay,  Best Supporting Actress (Brooklynn Prince).

Golden Globes: Best Supporting Actor (possibly winning), Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Director.


Get Out

Director: Jordan Peele

The most unexpected box-office sensation of 2017, horror-comedy Get Out has the potential to go all the way if Universal plays its cards right, as well as the fact it’s the only film they’ve got to push for awards contention.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Original Screenplay, Best Picture.

Golden Globe: Best Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy), Best Actor in a Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy).


I, Tonya 

Director: Craig Gillespie

To be honest, like Jackie last year, I was expecting this to be the Diana/Collateral Beauty of 2017 (given its writer has mostly been associated with mediocre rom-coms, please don’t kill me). Looks like I was wrong, especially when it comes to who is leading the Supporting Actress category (with Allison Janney receiving praise).

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actress (possibly winning), Best Actress.

Golden Globes: Best Supporting Actress (possibly winning), Best Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy), Best Actress in a Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy).


Lady Bird

Director: Greta Gerwig

Firstly, this film forms the second part of A24’s awards season push and secondly, it has the acclaim and it would be satisfying to see actress and indie darling Greta Gerwig receive recognition for her first outing as director.

It also has quite a cast including the likes of Saorise Ronan, Laurie Metcalf (the voice of Andy’s mother in the Toy Story trilogy and Mary Cooper from The Big Bang Theory), Tracy Letts, Lucas Hedges, Timothee Chalamet (quite a double whammy this year) and Stephen McKinley Henderson (Fences – both the film and stage play)

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actress (Laurie Metcalf), Best Actress, Best Original Screenplay.

Golden Globes: Best Supporting Actress (Laurie Metcalf), Best Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy), Best Actress in a Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy).


The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)

Director: Noah Baumbach

Unlikely to be in contention for Academy Awards, due to reasons we will get on to in the next entry, it could however be in for a smattering of Golden Globes and Indie Spirit nominations. In particular acting awards for its cast, with Adam Sandler (yes, you are reading that correctly) and Dustin Hoffman being singled out.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy), Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Motion Picture (Musical/Comedy) (Adam Sandler).


Mudbound

Director: Dee Rees

It may have been written off early on due to a lack of traction, but the aforementioned barren wasteland that is the Adapted Screenplay category and Netflix not having much else to push (save for a few documentaries and the previous entry) could see Dee Rees’s adaptation of Hillary Jordan’s 2008 novel return to the awards conversation. Keep a close eye out for a potential dark horse in the Supporting Actor category in the form of Straight Outta Compton’s Jason Mitchell.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor.


Phantom Thread

Director: Paul Thomas Anderson

Being this could be Daniel Day-Lewis’s final picture before retiring (although based on the number of times Hayao Miyazaki has announced his retirement, I will wait and see), it could garner quite the attention. However, there is more to this than just Day-Lewis.

There are many reasons that this could land awards attention, from director Paul Thomas Anderson (who will be doing double duties as director and cinematographer) to its period setting and studio backing it.

There’s even talk of nominations not just for Day-Lewis, but also for the likes of lead actress Vicky Krieps and Mike Leigh regular Lesley Manville. Although, there is the danger that (like some of Anderson’s recent features) it may not strike much of a chord with AMPAS (being referred to as a more artsy version of Fifty Shades of Gray – please refrain from such comparisons) and will face internal competition from Focus’s other contender Darkest Hour.

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Costume Design (possibly winning), Best Production Design, Best Make-up, Best Cinematography, Best Original Score (Jonny Greenwood), Best Supporting Actress (Lesley Manville), Best Original Screenplay, Best Actress (Vicky Krieps, depending on placement), Best Director, Best Picture.


The Post

Director: Steven Spielberg

Let’s see. Period drama. Check. Relevant storyline and timely themes. Well, it covers the New York Times and Washington Post’s uncovering of the Pentagon Papers, so check. Beloved AMPAS director (Steven Spielberg and his team including editor Michael Kahn, cinematographer Janusz Kaminski and the one and only John Williams). Check. Big names that will turn every awards body’s heads. Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep headline the feature. What do you think?

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Score (John Williams), Best Production Design, Best Editing, Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design.

Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Director, Best Actor (Drama), Best Actress (Drama), Best Screenplay, Best Score.


The Shape of Water

Director: Guillermo Del Toro

The biggest name to land from Venice and create ripples (if you pardon the pun) in the awards season outlook, The Shape of Water may sound unconventional (a love story between a mute woman and a fish-man during the Cold War), but it has critical acclaim to back it up and the Golden Lion that came with it.

Along with the final entry on the list, you can bet that Fox Searchlight will be launching a major campaign for this.

Also, a potential Best Actress nomination would more than make up for that painful snub we had to see Sally Hawkins go through back in 2008 (if Holly Hunter could win for not speaking in The Piano, Hawkins will do just fine here).

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards:  Best Picture, Best Director (possibly winning), Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor (Michael Shannon or Richard Jenkins), Best Supporting Actress (Octavia Spencer), Best Original Screenplay, Best Original Score (Alexandre Desplat), Best Production Design, Best Editing, Best Cinematography, Best Costume Design, Best Make-up, Best Visual Effects.

Golden Globes: Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Director (possibly winning), Best Actress (Drama), Best Supporting Actor (Michael Shannon or Richard Jenkins), Best Supporting Actress (Octavia Spencer), Best Screenplay, Best Score.


Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Director: Martin McDonagh

A major contender since its arrival at Venice, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri holds the honour of being Martin McDonagh’s most acclaimed film to date (sorry, In Bruges) and features a tour-de-force performance from Frances McDormand that could see her nab her second Oscar in the space of twenty years.

The screenplay could also be sweeping and crushing competition left and right during this awards season, and seeing it claim victory would serve as justice for In Bruges being unfortunate to share the Original Screenplay category with Milk (I like that film, so I won’t be harsh on it).

Also keep an eye out for Sam Rockwell; I was predicting him early on since he had the best supporting character in the script and also ‘Academy Award nominee Sam Rockwell’ would look good on the poster for the upcoming Dick Cheney biopic Backseat (in which Rockwell takes on the role of Dubya).

Nominations it could land (in order of likelihood):

Academy Awards: Best Original Screenplay (possibly winning), Best Actress (possibly winning), Best Supporting Actor, Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Score (Carter Burwell), Best Editing.

Golden Globes: Best Actress (Drama), Best Supporting Actor, Best Motion Picture (Drama), Best Director.


Love film? Then check out the extensive range of DVDs and Blu-Rays on the musicMagpie Store today! We’ve got everything from award winners to cult classics, all at incredible prices and all sent via FREE delivery. Why wouldn’t you?

SHOP NOW